FAQ

Asbestos

  1. what is asbestos?
    Asbestos is a naturally occurring fibrous mineral typically chrysotile, that is heat resistant, has good tensile strength and is resistant to chemical erosion. Due to this it is commonly used in fire-retardant and insulating materials and was a popular building material from the 1950's to 1990's.
  1. what is the danger of asbestos?
    The risk of lung cancer and mesothelioma increases with the number of fibers inhaled. The risk of lung cancer from inhaling asbestos fibers is also greater if you smoke. People who get asbestosis have usually been exposed to high levels of asbestos for a long time.
  2. where you can find asbestos in your property?

    Industrial Property

    • Inside
      1. Sprayed coatings on ceilings, walls, beams and columns
      2. Asbestos cement water tank
      3. Loose fill insulation
      4. Lagging on boilers and pipes
      5. AIB ceiling tiles
      6. Toilet seat and cistern
      7. AIB partition walls
      8. AIB panels in fire doors
      9. Asbestos rope seals, gaskets and paper
      10. Vinyl floor tiles
      11. AIB around boilers
      12. Textiles eg fire blankets
      13. Textured decorative coatings on walls and ceilings eg artex
    • Outside
      1. Asbestos cement roof
      2. Asbestos cement panels
      3. Asbestos cement gutters and downpipes
      4. Soffits - AIB or asbestos cement
      5. Asbestos cement flue
  3. Residential Property

    • Inside
      1. Asbestos cement Water tank
      2. Pipe lagging
      3. Loose fill insulation
      4. Textured decorative coating eg artex
      5. AIB ceiling tiles
      6. AIB bath panel
      7. Toilet seat and cistern
      8. AIB behind fuse box
      9. AIB airing cupboard and/or sprayed
      10. insulation coating boiler
      11. AIB partition wall
      12. AIB interior window panel
      13. AIB around boiler
      14. Vinyl floor tiles
      15. AIB behind fire
    • Outside
      1. Gutters and Asbestos cement downpipes
      2. Soffits - AIB or asbestos cement
      3. AIB exterior window panel
      4. Asbestos cement roof
      5. Asbestos cement panels
      6. Roofing felt
  4. Why you need professional team to remove it?

    Asbestos fibres can easily become air borne, creating a risk of serious illness if proper precautions are not taken.

    If you suspect there might be asbestos containing material and before renovations can take place, the product or material must be tested. If there is asbestos is present, proper procedures must be used before the material can be disturbed (removed, or cut). In many areas, there are strict regulations that define the procedures that must be used when working with different types of asbestos. Even if the work is to be done outdoors, these requirements must be followed.

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Mould

  1. what is mould?

    Fungi are a group of organisms which includes such things as mushrooms, yeasts, and moulds. Moulds can cause allergies, asthma and other health problems. We encounter mould every day. Foods spoil because of mould, leaves decay and pieces of wood lying on the ground rot due to mould.

    Moulds can be harmful or helpful, depending on where it grows. For example, the drug Penicillin is obtained from a specific type of mould, but some of the moulds that we find in our homes can be harmful to our health. Experts who have studied mould now say that "people should not live in mouldy houses".

    2.What is the danger of mould?

    • Eye, nose and throat irritation
    • Coughing and phlegm build-up
    • Wheezing and shortness of breath
    • Symptoms of asthma
    • Allergic reactions
    • If you suspect that you or your family's health is being affected by mould, talk to your health care provider as soon as possible.

      People respond to mould in different ways, depending upon the amount of exposure and the person's overall health. Some people are more vulnerable to the effects of mould than others. This includes children, the elderly and those with a weakened immune system or other medical condition(s), such as asthma, severe allergies or other respiratory conditions.

      3.where you can find mould in your property?

      • Damp materials such as carpeting or furniture
      • Paper products such as cardboard boxes
      • Wood, such as window sills, wall framing and firewood
      • Drywall
      • Find out if you have mould in your home. Check:
        Not all mould is obvious. It can grow inside walls or above ceiling tiles. Check for mould in damp places or where water damage has happened.
        1. The basement
        2. Under or behind stored items
        3. Under the kitchen or bathroom sink
        4. On the wall or floor next to the bathtub or shower
        5. At the bottom edge of windows
        6. Other damp places in your home
4. What causes mould in your property?
  • Condensation on surfaces due to excessive humidity, lack of ventilation, or low temperature
  • Steam or excess moisture in the air from baths/showers and cooking
  • Water leakage, such as from a roof or plumbing leak, a cracked basement, or flooding

5. How to prevent the mould growth in your property?

  • Check home foundation, walls, windows, roof, plumbing, tubs and sinks for water leaks. If you find a leak or a spill, dry the area and fix the leak.
  • Check window sills regularly for condensation or moisture, particularly during the cold months. If found, act quickly to dry the wet surface.
  • Ventilate your home
  • Turn on an exhaust fan or open a window when showering or cooking. Let the fan run for a few minutes after you are finished.
  • Check clothes dryer, bathroom and kitchen fans, stoves, and oil or propane heaters to be sure they are vented outside.
  • Open windows, when practical. Use fans as needed.

6.Why you need professional team to remove it?

  • Asbestos fibres can easily become air borne, creating a risk of serious illness if proper precautions are not taken.

    If you suspect there might be asbestos containing material and before renovations can take place, the product or material must be tested. If there is asbestos is present, proper procedures must be used before the material can be disturbed (removed, or cut). In many areas, there are strict regulations that define the procedures that must be used when working with different types of asbestos. Even if the work is to be done outdoors, these requirements must be followed.

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Did you know

  1. Controlling moisture and keeping your home dry is the key to preventing and stopping mould growth. Keep your home warm and ensure good air circulation.

    • Rooms or areas that become cold can encourage condensation to form and surrounding materials to become damp and mouldy.
    • Keep furniture and other belongings away from exterior walls to allow warm air to circulate.
  1. Remove items that may cause mould
    • Reduce the amount of stored materials, especially in the basement and closets.
    • Throw out wet and badly damaged or musty smelling items.
    • Do not store firewood inside the home.
    • Remove carpet in bathroom and basements that are damp.
    • Avoid storing items in cardboard boxes on basement floors.
  2. Keep your home clean and dry, clean and dry surfaces that get wet, such as:
    • Drip pans in your air conditioner, refrigerator, and dehumidifier.
    • Washing machine/tub, bathtub/shower, and surrounding walls.
    • Vacuum carpets and furniture often.
    • Keep drains in kitchen, bathroom and basement floor clear of debris.
    • Use air conditioners and dehumidifiers during humid weather, if possible.
  3. Minimize other indoor moisture sources
    • Avoid hanging laundry to dry indoors when possible. Remove dryer lint after each use.
    • Don't over-water plants and watch for signs of mould in the plants.
    • Take out garbage regularly.
    • Keep your sump pit covered.
  4. Prevent water from entering your home
    • Install downspout extensions to take rainwater and melted snow away from the home.
    • Make sure eavestrough/roof gutters and downspouts are connected and working. Clean and repair regularly.
    • Make sure the ground slopes away from the home foundation, so that water does not collect around the foundation and enter the home.

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Lead

  1. what is lead?

    Lead is a naturally occurring element found in small amounts in the earth's crust. While it has some beneficial uses, it can be toxic to humans and animals causing of health effects.

  2. what is the danger of lead paint?

    Lead is particularly dangerous to children because their growing bodies absorb more lead than adults do and their brains and nervous systems are more sensitive to the damaging effects of lead. Babies and young children can also be more highly exposed to lead because they often put their hands and other objects that can have lead from dust or soil on them into their mouths. Children may also be exposed to lead by eating and drinking food or water containing lead or from dishes or glasses that contain lead, inhaling lead dust from lead-based paint or lead-contaminated soil or from playing with toys with lead paint.

  1. what is the danger of lead paint?

    Adults may be exposed to lead by eating and drinking food or water containing lead or from dishes or glasses that contain lead. They may also breathe lead dust by spending time in areas where lead-based paint is deteriorating, and during renovation or repair work that disturbs painted surfaces in older homes and buildings. Working in a job or engaging in hobbies where lead is used, such as making stained glass, can increase exposure as can certain folk remedies containing lead. A pregnant woman's exposure to lead from these sources is of particular concern because it can result in exposure to her developing baby.

  2. Where is lead found?
    Lead can be found in all parts of our environment - the air, the soil, the water, and even inside our homes. Much of our exposure comes from human activities including the use of fossil fuels including past use of leaded gasoline, some types of industrial facilities, and past use of lead-based paint in homes. Lead and lead compounds have been used in a wide variety of products found in and around our homes, including paint, ceramics, pipes and plumbing materials, solders, gasoline, batteries, ammunition, and cosmetics.
  3. Prevent water from entering your home
    • Install downspout extensions to take rainwater and melted snow away from the home.
    • Make sure eavestrough/roof gutters and downspouts are connected and working. Clean and repair regularly.
    • Make sure the ground slopes away from the home foundation, so that water does not collect around the foundation and enter the home.

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If you still have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our professionals to ask. We are glad to help you understand the danger of hazard materials. Call at 778-881-4357 or email at info@renovation247.ca You can also fill out the form in Contact Us to send your questions, we will get back you within 24 hours. We are help to HELP.